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A MIRACLE OF NATURE


Named after the resplendent Northern Lights, which in Aboriginal myth illuminates the night sky like a brush of undulating fox tails, the Foxfire diamond is the rarest of its kind

A MIRACLE OF NATURE


Named after the resplendent Northern Lights, which in Aboriginal myth illuminates the night sky like a brush of undulating fox tails, the Foxfire diamond is the rarest of its kind

DISCOVERED BY CHANCE


 

The Foxfire was found buried deep beneath a frozen lake, in the remote Diavik mines of Canada – thousands of miles from civilization.

At 187.63 carats, the two-billion-year-old stone is the largest known, uncut gem-quality diamond ever to be discovered in North America. With a unique luminosity, the Foxfire gives off a singular glow, appearing to actually emit light. From its fascinating provenance and ethical pedigree to its extraordinary quality, size and remarkable color, the Foxfire is a diamond unlike any other.

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EXCITEMENT IS RISING


Around the word, speculation is building
around the FoxFire’s prospective buyer

EXCITEMENT IS RISING


Around the word, speculation is building
around the FoxFire’s prospective buyer

Beyond connoisseurs and collectors, investors are pursuing rare diamonds as a desirable new investment class. The owners of the stone, Amadena Investments, remain discreet on the topic, saying only that they have turned away interested parties, and are taking care to place the diamond with a client who will protect and preserve its singular legacy. 

 

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A CAPTIVATING ICON


 

First unveiled at London's Kensington Palace in 2015, the diamond has since embarked on a world tour, attracting renowned diamond dealers and experts from around the globe.

It’s currently on display at the Harry Winston Gallery in Washington's Smithsonian Museum, alongside the historic Hope Diamond. It will remain there until April 1, 2017, before continuing on its journey around the world.

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A MIRACULOUS DISCOVERY


In the course of its discovery, the Foxfire was very nearly destroyed

A MIRACULOUS DISCOVERY


In the course of its discovery, the Foxfire was very nearly destroyed

In the Diavik mines, diamond-bearing kimberlite ore is crushed down to less than 30 millimeters in the processing plant. Were it not for the Foxfire’s unique, elliptical shape, the diamond would have stood no chance of escaping intact. A remarkable tale of good fortune...and another fascinating facet to this astonishing stone.